Global Studies 2A:Comparative Political and Religious Systems
Wednesday, November 19, 2003
 
I admit i have not read all of your papers, so if this does not apply to all of you, I apologise... but I feel that you guys for the most part are missing the fact that winston is going to measure his success not on if he can overrun the govermnment, but simply if he can stay human, a great passage which goes into further detail on this can be found on 167 and the previous pages. In the end he does not end up succeeding b/c of the fact the party more or less turns him into something which is not human, some other form of an animal, or a thing. this is supported by many references made by smith throughout the work of party members and using words centered around animals to describe their victims. it is not that he doesn't succeed b/c he didn't single handedly over run the gov... for this was not his goal
-Aaron
 
Sam-
You say that
"What if Winston could rebel against Big Brother? What if the whole government collapsed? It wouldn’t matter."
and later on
"even if Winston could possibly rebel, he would just create anarchy and then a new government would arise going through the cycle presented in the quote. You start with Aristocracy, then you move to a Timocracy, then onto an Oligarchy, then to Democracy, and then Tyranny. This is followed by a brief period of anarchy, which completes the cycle and brings it back to an Aristocracy"
Are you saying that since the system cycles back, that no one should try to improve the sittuation because it shall lead back to the same sittuation in the future? Firstly, the only reason change happens (going along with your plato quote) is that there are people who come together and create anarchy, which results in the transformation from an oligarchy to a democracy. Yet if no one tries to do ne thing about the sittuation, then the cyle stops, and it shall always be in a state of oligarchy. Individuals are highly necessary for this change over, and thus i do not comprehend your logic by putting that paragraph in the paper, all the same, love to hear your thoughts
-Aaron
 
Sam
Global Studies 2A
Reflection Question 11
November 19, 2003

Why can Winston never really rebel from Big Brother? There are a few reasons for this. His thoughts are monitored, so he can’t group people together. He has no way of knowing when he is being watched so he can’t try to fight Big Brother.

If they suspect something happening, they will monitor him and whoever he’s with. Since a true rebellion is one only done by yourself, he can’t use anyone else. If he is doing anything suspicious, they can easily “erase” him from history. If he uses suicide to rebel, they can just erace its happening and get rid of the people who know him and might try to copy his actions.
“And when memory failed and written records were falsified—when that happened, the claim of the Party to have improved the conditions of human life had got to be accepted, because there did not exist, and never again could exist, any standard against which it could be tested.” (1984, by George Orwell, Book one, Ch. 8) This quote shows how they can erase a persons identity.

It is a very bleak situation him and his other not wise, but knowledgably “rebels.” Oceania is an advanced version of the United States of America. If we can’t rebel now, what chance does Winston have? If a group of people got to know too much, and they looked like they could be a threat, our government would find out about. Through credit card records or surveillance. Then they would erase the groups existence, most likely by changing there porpous. “The evil doers” will pay for their acts against our great prevailing nation.

What if Winston could rebel against Big Brother? What if the whole government collapsed? It wouldn’t matter. “It won’t be hard for you to hear them,” I said. “For those I mean are also the ones having names; the one that is praised by the many, that Cretan and Laconian regime; and second in place and second in praise, the one called oligarchy, a regime filled with throngs of evils; and this regime’s adversary, arising next in order, democracy; and then illness of a city.” (The Republic of Plato, by Plato, page 222, 544c)
This quote from Plato shows how even if Winston could possibly rebel, he would just create anarchy and then a new government would arise going through the cycle presented in the quote. You start with Aristocracy, then you move to a Timocracy, then onto an Oligarchy, then to Democracy, and then Tyranny. This is followed by a brief period of anarchy, which completes the cycle and brings it back to an Aristocracy.

If you look at each step of the system, it works. You start off with a relatively just group of leaders. This is because they all still believe in their new society because they started it and most likely had a good reason for it. Then you get a Timocracy where they value honoring the past generations of the Aristocracy, because they started off the country. After that gets corrupted, an Oligarchy arises. This is where people think that they are upholding the honor of their society, but really they are just gaining power for the leadership class. Once people don’t like the leadership class because they are being lied to, they want equality for all. They want a Democracy. Once the wealthy corrupt this, they use the equality to take advantage of others and turn the society into a tyranny. This is like an Aristocracy with one huge difference. The leaders aren’t just. So eventually your Winston’s will see the light out of the cave, and rebel against the wealthy leadership class. This will lead to anarchy and complete the first loop.

In conclusion, Winston can never truly rebel, because of the above quote from Plato. He is trapped, like we are, within a system of governments. There also aren’t yet enough people for him to rebel with, so he couldn’t even bring down the Tyranny anyways.

Tuesday, November 18, 2003
 
Why Does Winston Rebel Against Big Brother, and Will he Succeed?
Winston rebels against Big Brother for many reasons, but they all circle around the fact that Winston yearns for the past. His desire to rebel against the current situation, in an effort to bring back the past, is symbolically displayed throughout 1984: “Wine was a thing he had read and dreamed about. Like the glass paperweight or Mr. Charrington’s half-remembered rhymes, it belonged to the vanished, raomantic past, the olden time as he liked to call it in his secret thoughts” (171). The glass paperweight, Mr. Charrington’s rhymes, as well as the wine symbolize the untouched past which he ever so much desires.
Winston desires the ability to freely express his emotions, yet this is harshly suppressed by Big Brother: “The thing that he was about to do was to open a diary. This was not illegal (nothing was illegal, since there were no longer any laws), but if detected it was reasonably certain that it would be punished by death, or at least by twenty-five years in a forced-labor camp” (6). Due to the system, just one mark of pen on paper concluded in his death: “To mark the paper was the decisive act,” (7) nevertheless he opined that the ability to express his thoughts on a medium other than his cerebral network was more important than a longer life span. He understands that in the pre-party time, he would have had the ability to express his thoughts freely without any outside barrier.
He also yearns for the time of the past when he had the ability to partake in a public relationship with a member of the opposite sex where he wouldn’t have to constantly worry about losing his life. His hatred of the party is blatantly shown on page 15: “He realized why it was he hated her. He hated her because she was young and pretty and sexless, because he wanted to go to bed with her and would never do so, because round her sweet supple waist, which seemed to ask you to encircle it with your arm, there was only the odious scarlet sash, aggressive symbol of chastity” (15). In the previous section it is apparent that Winston does not actually hate Julia. To the contrary, prior to his meeting with her, she symbolizes the party, and the sex-less attitude that goes hand in hand with it.
To understand whether or not Winston will succeed, it is imperative to first define “success.” Success means different things to all people, yet from the text the reader can get a pretty clear picture of what Winston considers success. “If the object was not to stay alive but to stay human, what difference did it ultimately make? They could not alter your feelings; for that matter you could not alter them yourself, even if you wanted to. They could lay bare in the utmost detail everything that you had done or said or though; but the inner heart, whose workings were mysterious even to yourself remained impregnable” (167). Winston realizes that it is inevitable he will die due to the bloody hands of the party. He also understands that petrolean rebellion is not an immediate option because the proles do not have any access to true history, due to the party’s control of the press. Ergo, he does not define success as the overthrowing of the government because he understands this act is near to impossible in the current circumstances he is living in. He simply defines success as the ability to stay human, and not let the government manipulate his soul.
I highly doubt that Winston will be able to succeed. I originally agreed when him when he spoke of some sort of intangible portion of the soul which was incapable of being altered by anyone, and always remained human, until I considered the pictures I had seen, as well as the documentaries I had watched concerning the Jews located in concentration camps during the Holocaust.
Both the Jews and the people of Oceana are under the rule of totalitarians. Due to the fact that it is inevitable that Winston shall get caught, it is also inevitable that like the Jews of European concentration camps, he shall have to undergo extreme amounts of torture. Many people such as Ellie Wiesell and my relatives kept their human spirit throughout the horrific tortures of camps such as Auschwitz. But many did not. This is best shown by viewing any documentary or reading any book depicting the Holocaust. One notices that it is apparent that some of the survivors look and sound like there is something drastically different in them, as if they had lost their inner humanity. If this happened with this multitude of people being reduced to totalitarian torture like Winston inevitably will be reduced to, I believe it is very appropriate to assume that Winston’s inner soul will be broken, and thus will not succeed.

 
Erica
you obviously agree that Big Brother has absolute control, right. And if that is so then doesn't that suggest that they oversee everything and know where the possible rebellions could occur? You even say it here, "In 1984 Big Brother is controlling absolutely everything that is going on in Oceania." well if this is the case than why (just out of curiosity because I'm a little confused whether or not there is that slight little change rebellion is possible) do you think that the proles will have a chance to rebel? Another question is if the Party does have all this power to see everything then isn't it true that they would be able to control the rebel, just like they do with the party members? I know that all things come to an end, but I just can't help but think that Big Brother wont slip up. Maybe your right though. Maybe they'll miss something, but there is still that fact; they oversee everything and by using fear and manipulation they control the society making the government balanced.
don't get me wrong here. I don't really know what to think. I'm still caught up with the power that they posses and the control over the reality that they have. However I have to say it is true that all things do come to an end....
sorry for being confusing and contradictory (to myself)
-the confused little one
 
Andy Howe
11/17/03
Subject of the jones: Why is Winston Smith rebelling against Big Brother? Can he possibly succeed?

According the first half of the book 1984, by George Orwell, Winston Smith is a middle-aged man who works in the Records Department in the Ministry of Truth in the perceived year of 1984 through the eyes of 1948. Winston Smith lives in a very dreadfully oppressed and controlled society. The government or Big Brother controls literally everything that went on, goes on, and what continues to go on. Meaning, Big Brother does not only control what happens to the society’s population in a physical sense but he (or ‘they,’ Big Brother may not just be one person) also controls the population’s minds, controlling their perception of history, the present, and the future. With total manipulation, Big Brother can accomplish anything without question, a totalitarian, having people working for him and his manipulative purposes at all times.
Winston, having access to accurate history documents through newspapers and other print, he is able to gain enough knowledge to form a hypothesis stating that conditions of life in the past were not as bad and restrictive as the current conditions. At one point, Winston is at work and he finds a picture of some early revolutionary fathers with Big Brother and they are on enemy soil; Winston begins to question the government’s integrity. “The past was erased, the erasure was forgotten, the lie became truth. Just once in his life he had possessed-after the event: that was what counted-concrete, unmistakable evidence of an act of falsification. He held it in his fingers for as long as thirty seconds… Some time after their release Winston had actually seen all three of them in the Chestnut Tree Café. He remembered the sort of terrified fascination with which he had watched them out of the corner of his eye” (75-76). It is evident that Winston Smith’s suspicions of the government deceit have been proved correct. Winston finds a picture of three revolutionary leaders who had been accused of being traitors and had been supposedly “vaporized” but in reality they were not. Smith soon saw all three of them at a local café and he could not believe his eyes, realization set in.
Winston thinks that Big Brother is a false evil figure, and he rebels against it. Rebelling against Big Brother is almost literally impossible without getting “vaporized.” Telescreens, tools used by the thought police to monitor all activity that goes on in the city, make it almost impossible to initiate any sort of rebellion against Big Brother. So Winston resorts to things like thought crime by writing in a secret journal and he puts down Big Brother and writes about things that could get him killed. Smith also rebels by having a sexual relationship, going into shops, utilizing the proles, and by not applauding the telescreen’s announcements. In his mind he is trying in a subtle way to template people by showing them that he does not believe in the views of Big Brother, yet he is not trying to deal with the Thought Police by making a substantial impression on them. This fear of the Thought Police and of being “vaporized” keeps Winston and the rest of the population in line with what Big Brother wants.
There is no possible way for Winston Smith to successfully rebel against the Party of Big Brother. A successful rebellion against Big Brother would be to completely overthrow the government and establish a replacement. In the text it mentions that the only real chance of rebellion would have to come from the proles, who make up about 85% of the population. This shows little evidence of any sort of hope for a successful rebellion, but it gets shot down without mercy. Big Brother is simply too strong to be successfully overturned. The facts are that Big Brother has people from the Thought Police stationed everywhere where any possible chance of rebellion might begin.
Hence, Mr. Carrington, middle aged man, working for the Thought Police and is stationed in an antique shop and living with the proles. This is genius of Big Brother because he stops any sort of realization or enlightenment from occurring within the proles, so obviously no rebellion through the masses could occur; which is a main ingredient for a rebellion in the first place. Even if by chance, about two hundred people became enlightened and crawled back in the cave to pull others out, it would be ‘peaches’ for Big Brother to simply eliminate them and ‘bam’ the revolution/rebellion is terminated. Another important point is that Big Brother creates a fake ‘rebel’ organization called, ‘The Brotherhood,” which the people who are questioning the government will seek out. So with Thought Police agents as the contacts and handlers of the ‘Brotherhood’ information, they will be able to know everyone who is committing ‘thought crimes’ and opposes the government. The rebels are sabotaged at the outset.
By having Big Brother also control the fake rebellion, the ‘Brotherhood,’ it is impossible for anyone of any class to succeed in rebelling and overthrowing Big Brother. The rigid Big Brother has complete control and manipulation over the entire population and there is not any room for change or outside influence. Thus the country could never end war and live in peace with the other two countries for fear of influence and enlightenment. Big Brother ‘rules with an iron fist’ and will not tolerate genuine though; rebellion is an illusion.


 
SS 5a
Erica Boudette
11/17/03
Reflection on 1984

Question: Why does Winston rebel and can he succeed?

In 1984 Big Brother is controlling absolutely everything that is going on in Oceania. Winston works rewriting the past to make it agree with everything that Big Brother is saying now. This is an ongoing job because since the present is constantly changing, so is the past.
That is the first reason why Winston would want to rebel, because he can’t find the truth in anything. Where is the first place people today look when they want to find out information? Usually they look at books or newspapers that were written about that particular subject. They trust that the information will be fairly accurate as to what has actually happened. But Winston can’t even trust the past. He has no way of finding out what really happened in the past, because it is always changing to be whatever Big Brother wants it to be, and Winston knows this because he rewrites it. For example Winston can create a person in the past, “Today he should commemorate Comrade Olgilvy. It was true that there was no such person as Comrade Olgilvy, but a few lines of print and a couple of fake photographs would soon bring him into existence.” (42) Now anybody who looks up newspaper articles in the past would see the story on Comrade Olgilvy and assume that he was a real person. Because he is in print, and that is really the only reference point people have to the past. Everybody has to trust in what the newspapers and books say because it is the only outlet that they have into finding out the truth. That is what Winston wants to do, find out the truth about the past.
And he wants to do that because he needs to know what to think in the present, is his society now really that bad? Should he be grateful for what he has now, like Big Brother says? Was the past really that bad, and is this really better now? He doesn’t know. He doesn’t know what to think about any of his society at all because he has nothing to compare them too. As far as he can find out, the life he is living right now is perfect. The problem is that with Winston knowing that the past is being rewritten he knows that his society is filled with lies. The past isn’t true so why should the present be? Why should anything he knows now be true? This is why Winston rebels, because he wants to know how to think about the society he is living in. He wants to know the truth about the society he is living in and what it really is. He is rebelling against Big Brother because he knows as long as Big Brother is in power he will never know anything.
Winston can never succeed in this revolution. He is far to deep into Big Brother’s organization already. The problem with Winston rebelling is that he is a party member, he is already involved, and he helps to spread the lies of Big Brother every single day. Everyone Winston knows is also a party member and they are also spreading the lies of Big Brother. One person can not rebel against society and make any difference at all. One person cannot overthrow a whole regime. And that is all Winston is, one person. In order to rebel against Big Brother he needs a group, a group of more people than just him and Julia. But it is impossible for Winston to ever get a group, because everyone he would talk to is a party member. And it is impossible to tell how deep in a party member is, and really they are with him or not. Winston makes this mistake when he trusts O’Brian. He trusts that O’Brian is part of the rebellion and will help him. He trusts O’Brian on pretty much no foundation at all, just a gut feeling. That is why Winston can never rebel, because he has to trust a party member, or several hundred party members, and there is no way to tell whether or not they want to rebel, or if they are really working for Big Brother.
“The only hope lies in the Proles.” I think however that it is possible for a rebellion to succeed. Not Winston’s rebellion, but the rebellion of the Proles. In order for this to work however, all the Proles have to start to become restless at around the same time, so there is no way to pick them off. If they all start to change, and want to change society. It is likely that in the Proles would all start to feel restless at the same time, because they like to maintain their level of comfort, while Big Brother likes to take away more and more from them. If Big Brother starts to get to greedy, or starts to lower their standard of living to fast, then they will notice, and in all likelihood, they will end up rebelling against them. It is only a matter of time until Big Brother makes the mistake that lets the Proles realize what is going on.

Monday, November 17, 2003
 
Tobi Drori
11/17/03
1984
-I'm watching you!
“Big Brother is watching you.” (Page 2). What does this mean; who is Big Brother, and why is “he” watching “you?” This is a saying, or rather a slogan used by the Party in the book 1984. It is a term that is used to foreworn the society that they are being watched every day, on every hour and every second. No one is alone in the society of Oceania because they can never know when or where they are actually being watched. The individual must always assume that someone is watching them, whether it is the inner Party itself, their friends, or even their own family. The notion of privacy does not exist. Everything a person does or thinks is recorded and known in order to keep power within the government’s hands.
The past, the future, and even the present are all controlled, and manipulated for the purpose of keeping a balance. What is this balance? It is a system of a stable government. Yet for the individual it’s the opposite. They have no control over what they do and what they think. This hinders them from being able to think and feel for themselves. The inner Party oversees everything, which means that there is nothing that they can or cannot do to direct and alter “things” in order to maintain the absolute power that they possess.
Who would ever want to live in a world where they have no authority over themselves? However, how can they escape such a place if they are the ones who are considered insane? They are the minority, the select few in this overpowering, manipulative society, who see out of the cave that has been created by the government. Although, they cannot break away from this “trap” because it is inevitable that the end will always escort them back into the cave. Yet, this truth does not stop people from rebelling against the government.
Winston Smith a 39 year old, and a minor member of the Party, is one of these select few that are anti-Big Brother, and think that the Party is taking away the individual’s human rights. He believes that there is something more. Something beyond what the inner Party tells them. There is another truth, which is being hidden by the party, the oppressor. He sees something more; a past that no one else sees because there is no proof, but only his own memories. “Who controls the past controls the future; who controls the present controls the past.” (Page 248). Everything that was once true in history is transformed into another truth, which replaces the old because by controlling what happened in the past they can control what happens in the future. They control what people think to be true, and their memories. “In memory. Very well, then. We, the Party, control all records, and we control all memories. Then we control the past, do we not?” (Page 248). This is what allows Big Brother to manipulate the past because everything exists in records and in memory, and when records are changed, memory does not matter.
No one questions the truths that are told to them, but Winston does. He knows for a fact that history is constantly being altered because he is the one doing it. It is his job; the party tells him what to “correct,” and he does it. It is not just history that the Party controls, they direct life. They do it by fear, torture, and manipulation. No matter what, the Party has complete control over the lives of the individuals, and Winston disgusts the Party for this. Where ever he looks, or whatever he does he is being controlled. “On coins, on stamps, on the covers of books, on banners, on posters, and on the wrapping of a cigarette packet— everywhere. Always the eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you.” (Page 27).
Winston loathes Big Brother for changing the past and controlling what people think. Preventing them from seeing the truth and expressing themselves because of alteration to history, and doublethink. Doublethink is the process, which was created by the party in order to eliminate the notions of words that might be susceptible for rebellion. These words are abolished because they are used for the individual to say what he/she feels, and by getting rid of that ability, the individual becomes a “toy for the government.” A hollow person who knows nothing besides what the Party feeds into their minds. Furthermore, by the party reducing the vocabulary and the true meaning of the words they become even more powerful.
Winston rebels against the Party because he cannot accept the society that he lives in. He wants freedom and independence from Big Brother, and believes that there is something beyond what the Party says to be true. Winston knows that he himself will never succeed to see the day where the Party will be defeated, but he knows something else. “No,’ he said a little more hopefully, ‘no; that’s quite true. They can’t get inside you. If you can feel that staying human is worth while, even when it can’t have any result whatever, you’ve beaten them.” (Page 166). This encourages him to rebel even with the knowledge that the thought police will soon capture him, and then he will be “vaporized.” He feels that it is possible that this incredibly stable government will eventually fall, and it will be due to all of the rebellions that will happen. He is convinced that through his love affair, writing in his journal about his passionate hate towards Big Brother, joining the anti-Big Brother Brotherhood, and other acts of rebellion that things will change for the better for the individual. “When he spoke of murder, suicide, venereal disease, amputated limbs, and altered faces, it was with a faint air of persiflage. ‘This is unavoidable,’ his voice seemed to say; ‘this is what we have got to do, unflinchingly. But this is not what we shall be doing when life is worth living again.” (Page 175).
Winston can write in his journal and say, “DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER”
(Page 18), as many times as he wants. He can think in his mind 2+2=4, and not 2+2=5, which is what the Party has told the society to be true. He can commit thought crimes. He can break other laws such as him engaging in his affair with Julia. He can go to where the proles live, and buy a room where he thinks he is alone. He can even join a brotherhood that is against Big Brother. However, no matter what he does, it will never effect the government because they are in control of this rebellion. They see everything that is happening; everything that Winston does is not a mystery to them. Wherever Winston believed that he was alone and safe, he was not.
All along he believed that his hide out was “telescreen free,” but it wasn’t. In fact Mr. Charrington was a member of the thought police. Winston was being watched the entire time he was in his hide out with Julia because there was already a telescreen in the room. Even when he joined the brotherhood, and believed that O’Brien, an inner Party member, was against Big Brother they were watching his actions. The inner Party was the one that created the brotherhood, and the book written by Goldstein on Oligarchical Collectivism in the first place. The Party was controlling Winston’s complete revolution. They knew exactly where and what would erupt this rebellion, and made sure that they could control those areas, and secure them. Why though, would they let the revolt to even occur, if they could stop it from even happening? They let them intentionally happen because they need the rebellions to take place. They rebellions help them seek out those that have the negative thoughts about Big Brother, and then take them to the Ministry of Love where they are petrified and made to learn to love Big Brother and the society in which they live in. The select few like Winston will inevitably face the truth that the rebellion is impossible because the Party controls everything. They control the minds, the thoughts, the truths of the individuals of the society, and by letting some rebellion occur, which could never affect the government; they gain more control over the society. Just like with Winston, a man who believed that the Party could never make him change his beliefs, they made him succumb to the inevitable. They tortured him with ever method, emptied his beliefs, and made him realize that the Party had complete control. They made him part of the society, and now they control what he perceives. Rebellion is futile.


 
John Donahue
11/16/03
Global
1984
Is someone watching you read this?

Is it possible for Winston to rebel? Of course not. How can you rebel when you think that you are being watched all the time? Grant it, Winston’s intentions are good, but with the monitoring that goes on in Oceania, it can’t happen. How can you possibly rebel when they can catch you for just thinking about rebelling? How can you rebel when a revolution is already being put on by big brother? You would have to get at least 2/3 of the proles to even stand a chance.
Winston wants to learn about the past, and find out what life was like before Big Brother, seems harmless. In Oceania, there is no past, only the present. The books have all been rewritten, so how do people even know how to start a revolution? "The past was dead, the future was unimaginable." Part 1, Chapter 2, pg. 28. No one knew what the , “ real past,” was like, and even worse there weren’t too many people that wanted to find out.
Big Brother finds out everything eventually. Even when they know that someone is planning a revolution, they let them plan it a then squash them because they have been monitoring it the entire time. My friends little brother is a brain when it comes to any multiplayer video games. His favorite thing to do is let you get just a little bit ahead of him, and act as if he has no clue how to play the game. Whenever I play him, and I’m winning I always so to myself, “ Oh man, I’m finally going to beat him.” Then, out of nowhere, he comes back and destroys me. This is exactly what Big Brother does. They know that Winston is planning this revolution, but they play dumb and let him do so because they know that they still hold the power.
"'Who controls the past', ran the Party slogan, 'controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.'" Part 1, Chapter 3, pg. 37. Big Brother can make you think and believe anything they want. With newspeak, eventually you even be able to think about a revolution, because you won’t even know what those words mean.

 
John Donahue
11/16/03
Global
1984
Is someone watching you read this?

Is it possible for Winston to rebel? Of course not. How can you rebel when you think that you are being watched all the time? Grant it, Winston’s intentions are good, but with the monitoring that goes on in Oceania, it can’t happen. How can you possibly rebel when they can catch you for just thinking about rebelling? How can you rebel when a revolution is already being put on by big brother? You would have to get at least 2/3 of the proles to even stand a chance.
Winston wants to learn about the past, and find out what life was like before Big Brother, seems harmless. In Oceania, there is no past, only the present. The books have all been rewritten, so how do people even know how to start a revolution? "The past was dead, the future was unimaginable." Part 1, Chapter 2, pg. 28. No one knew what the , “ real past,” was like, and even worse there weren’t too many people that wanted to find out.
Big Brother finds out everything eventually. Even when they know that someone is planning a revolution, they let them plan it a then squash them because they have been monitoring it the entire time. My friends little brother is a brain when it comes to any multiplayer video games. His favorite thing to do is let you get just a little bit ahead of him, and act as if he has no clue how to play the game. Whenever I play him, and I’m winning I always so to myself, “ Oh man, I’m finally going to beat him.” Then, out of nowhere, he comes back and destroys me. This is exactly what Big Brother does. They know that Winston is planning this revolution, but they play dumb and let him do so because they know that they still hold the power.
"'Who controls the past', ran the Party slogan, 'controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.'" Part 1, Chapter 3, pg. 37. Big Brother can make you think and believe anything they want. With newspeak, eventually you even be able to think about a revolution, because you won’t even know what those words mean.

 
John Donahue
11/16/03
Global
1984
Is someone watching you read this?

Is it possible for Winston to rebel? Of course not. How can you rebel when you think that you are being watched all the time? Grant it, Winston’s intentions are good, but with the monitoring that goes on in Oceania, it can’t happen. How can you possibly rebel when they can catch you for just thinking about rebelling? How can you rebel when a revolution is already being put on by big brother? You would have to get at least 2/3 of the proles to even stand a chance.
Winston wants to learn about the past, and find out what life was like before Big Brother, seems harmless. In Oceania, there is no past, only the present. The books have all been rewritten, so how do people even know how to start a revolution? "The past was dead, the future was unimaginable." Part 1, Chapter 2, pg. 28. No one knew what the , “ real past,” was like, and even worse there weren’t too many people that wanted to find out.
Big Brother finds out everything eventually. Even when they know that someone is planning a revolution, they let them plan it a then squash them because they have been monitoring it the entire time. My friends little brother is a brain when it comes to any multiplayer video games. His favorite thing to do is let you get just a little bit ahead of him, and act as if he has no clue how to play the game. Whenever I play him, and I’m winning I always so to myself, “ Oh man, I’m finally going to beat him.” Then, out of nowhere, he comes back and destroys me. This is exactly what Big Brother does. They know that Winston is planning this revolution, but they play dumb and let him do so because they know that they still hold the power.
"'Who controls the past', ran the Party slogan, 'controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.'" Part 1, Chapter 3, pg. 37. Big Brother can make you think and believe anything they want. With newspeak, eventually you even be able to think about a revolution, because you won’t even know what those words mean.

 
Why is Winston Smith rebelling against Big Brother? Can he possibly succeed?
-Rachel Smith


Winston Smith is a 39-year-old man, who hates totalirian control, and is haunted by Big Brother. Winston, not wanting to be controlled by this Party, rebels against Big Brother because of many different reasons. First of all, Big Brother is a form in which the government monitors the people, and controls everything in life to the point in which even thinking bad things is against the law. He quotes, “Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimeters inside you skull.” (p. 27) He wants to test the limits, and he wants his freedom and individuality back. Winston also believes though that the party will eventually catch him and punish him. In believing this, he allows himself to take risks about rebelling, and write things like “Down with Big Brother” in his diary. He knows that the Thought police can completely wipe anything he’s said out of existence, and he quotes, “How could you make appeal to the future when not a trace of you, not even an anonymous word scribbled on a piece of paper, could physically survive?” (27) Because he is sure he will get caught, he is even more obligated to rebel and convinces himself in doing so. Telescreens are everywhere in 1984. It is the government’s way of watching you; hence “Big Brother Is Watching You” Winston has complete paranoia about when he is being watched, however it doesn’t stop him from doing anything risky. Along with the Party manipulating their minds, they also control the subject of physical pain. In the end, when Winston is captured, he comes to the agreement that nothing is worse then physical pain and no emotional loyalty can be stopped to come out if you are face to face with your worst nightmare. The Party controls reality, convincing them that 2 +2=5.
When he meets his lover Julia, he begins to have an extreme sexual affair with her. Julia is a pragmatic kind of woman who believes strongly in making the most out of her life. Julia is obsessed with enjoying sex, even though the Party does not allow it. Winston finds that the more men she sleeps with, the more attracted he is to her. Why? He quotes, “ I hate purity, I hate goodness. I don’t want any virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone to be corrupt to the bones. (p 126) Meaning, the more men she is sleeping with, the more men that are rebelling. However again, she is not interested in rebelling.
When Winston first meets and gets to talk to O’Brien, he is deeply excited but also anxious. He thins that O’Brien is also rebelling against the Party, and he can’t wait to share his thoughts with someone who understands so much with what he is going through. He also knows though that this may lead him quickly to the Ministry of Love, where he will be killed. When the two meet, Winston is not sure if he can be trusted. Julia and him travel to O’Brien’s together. When they feel they are safe, Winston tells O’Brien that they are both enemies of the Party, and they would like to be part of the Brotherhood. O’Brien listens, and leads them in a ritual of becoming part of the Brotherhood. He then tells Winston that they may or may not meet again.
And then… Winston gets caught. When he gets caught and taken to the cell, you can see him again realize that nothing is worse then physical pain. He learns that O’Brien once rebelled, and that they got him “Once a long time ago.” This section is clearly shown that the Party can convince the people of anything. This is why Winston will not succeed in rebelling against Big Brother. Because Winston believed that he would be caught no matter what, this implied to him to trust O’Brien. Because he is tortured with great pain, the emotional power is granted to the person who is providing the pain; thus O’Brien. O’Brien tells him over and over that he must love Big Brother. When he is brought into Room 101, O’Brien explains to him what will happen to him if he does not give in. Since Winston has believed all along that the Party will kill him, he has trouble believing now that he will stay alive and love Big Brother. Room 101 tries to convince him to love the Party. He soon breaks, and yells out, “Do it to Julia! I don’t care what you do to her!” (p. 286) The Party and O’Brien have proved to him that he is a
prisoner of his own body. Since he is limited, he now cannot and has no reason to rebel. He then smiles when he thinks about the concept of Big Brother. He has convinced himself that it is good, and makes him feel safe. The ending of the book quotes, “ But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother.” (p. 297) SO SAD L

Sunday, November 16, 2003
 
i am very confused at the end of your paper Sam. what is it exactly that you are trying to say? do you mean that if that person chooses that one right preception of perfection then they are right about that perfection? you need to clairify your endings.

 
Will Meyer
11/13/03
SS5
Why is Winston Smith Rebelling? And can he succeed?

I believe that the reason that Winston Smith is rebelling is quite easy to answer. He is rebelling because he wants to understand what the ultimate truth is. He is rebelling because he wants to escape the cave that the party has put him in and understand what life is really all about.

Another main reason that Winston is rebelling is because he wants to improve his quality of life. He does not mind his job however he wishes that his life in general could be better. “Life, if you looked about you, bore no resemblance not only to the lies that streamed out of the telescreens, but even to the ideals that the party was trying to achieve. Great areas of it, even for a party member, were neutral and nonpolitical, a matter of slogging through dreary jobs.� (74). This quote proves that Winston doesn’t mind his job however he is sick and tired of slogging through the same routine every day. And he is also very curious as to what life really should be like. He thinks that there is a better way to live then the way that they are living now but he is not sure.

“The reality was decaying, dingy cites, where underfed people shuffled to and fro in leaky shoes, in patched up nineteenth century houses that smelt always of cabbage and bad lavatories.� (74). This quote proves that Winston Smith is rebelling for the common good of the people. He wants people to be better off then they are in this quote. This quote also proves that there is hope in Winston Smiths rebellion. It says that the reality that Big Brother has created is starting to fall apart. People are becoming more and more aware that the condition of their lives is not very good. There is a possibility that the rebellion will succeed however I am not sure wether or not it will happen during Winston’s life time. To me, the party seems to be too safely ensconced in its tight power web.

There is however hope for Winston Smith. And this hope lies in the face of O’ Brien. “His courage seemed suddenly to stiffen of its own accord. The face of O’ Brien, not called up by any obvious association, had floated into his mind.� (81). This quote in particular proves that O’ Brien is Winston’s guiding force. He compels Winston to rebel against the party even though he is not even sure if O’ Brien is on his side.

“Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two equals four. If that is granted, all else fallows.� (81). These words that Winston wrote in his diary proves to me that if a person is allowed to understand the ultimate truth, then they will be able to see for themselves what real life is all about. I also believe that this is Winston’s main goal for getting rid of Big Brother and the party.

“His heart sank as he thought of the enormous power arrayed against him, the ease with which any party intellectual would overthrow him in a debate, the subtle arguments which he would not be able to understand, much less answer.� (81). This quote proves that Winston cannot possibly succeed in his quest for freedom. There is just to much power allied against his ideals for him to be able to succeed. Eventually for one reason or another the party will collapse. Take Russia for example, it was supposed to never fall however due to the tests of time it did fall. And just like Russia all things in this world eventually come to an end. Whether it be in a month, or a thousand years, “everything that has a beginning has an end.� (Matrix Revoloutions).



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